Todays Events - January 25, 2021

  • BOE Regular Meeting
    6:30 PM - Mt. Olive Middle School

Upcoming Events

  • Feb 8th - Feb 8th, 2021 - BOE Work Session Meeting
    6:30 PM - Mt. Olive Middle School

  • Feb 15th - Feb 15th, 2021 - SCHOOLS CLOSED

  • Feb 22nd - Feb 22nd, 2021 - BOE Regular Meeting
    6:30 PM - Mt. Olive Middle School

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Hybrid Cohort Schedule

Mount Olive Middle School

Hybrid Schedule - Monday through Friday

START

END

 Day 1

 Day 2

 Day 3

 Day 4

 7:55 a.m.

8:10 a.m.

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

8:13 a.m.

8:56 a.m.

 Period 1

 Period 2

 Period  3

 Period 4

8:59 a.m.

9:42 a.m.

 Period 2

 Period 3

 Period 4

 Period 1

9:45 a.m.

10:28 a.m.

 Period  3

 Period 4

 Period  1

 Period 2

10:31 a.m.

11:14 a.m.

Period  5

 Period 6

 Period 7

 Period 8

11:17 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

 Period 6

 Period 7

 Period 8

 Period 5

12:03 p.m.

12:46 p.m.

 Period 7

 Period 8

 Period 5

 Period  6

Teacher Lunch - 12:46 p.m. -1:31 p.m.

1:31 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. -  Office Hours, PLC, Small Group


Bianca Marrow researches Otzi the Iceman 

CSI: Italy, 3300 B.C.

Otzi the Iceman looks spry considering he's 5300 years old

Sixth-graders were recently challenged to solve a cold case. Ice cold.

The mummified body of a 5,300-year old man was found 30 years ago, literally in the middle of nowhere: in the snowy Northern Alps along the border of Austria and Italy. Named Otzi the Iceman by scientists, he initially was thought to have frozen to death, a logical thought given the climate and terrain; Otzi was later found to have an arrowhead lodged in his shoulder, as well as wounds to his hands. Who was this Copper Age man? Was the arrow wound severe enough to cause his death, and if not, how did he die? And why was he on this snowy ridge, 10,000 feet up?

The students worked in teams to research Otzi, the oldest human mummy ever found. They examined the four prevailing theories on Otzi’s cause of death by using a variety of text and video resources, including the information on a website that the sixth-grade social studies teachers put together. The research teams then were asked to form their own evidenced-based conclusions.

Did Otzi freeze to death?

Was he killed by his own people?

Was he the victim of a ritual killing, perhaps sacrificed to the deities who were thought to live in the mountains?

Was he killed in self-defense?

With no witnesses to question, the students had to solve the mystery using forensic reports, photos of the artifacts found in Otzi’s possession such as his copper axe and arrows, and photos of his clothes. The evidence all had stories to tell, often contradictory. 

“This project challenged students to think like archaeologists,” said social studies teacher Jennie Merklin. “They had to analyze primary and secondary sources, and examine evidence to form their own inferences on how Otzi may have died as well as what his life may have been like in prehistoric times.”

The teams presented their theories to their classmates, citing the evidence that supported their conclusions.

In addition to Merklin, teachers Nick Gonzalez, Ashley Lopez, Fran Ridge, and Stephanie Tarnowski worked on the project.


Meet our new vice principal

When Agatha Wilke joined the district as MOMS’ new vice principal, a rare education quartet was completed. She added “school administrator” to her experience, which also includes serving on a board of education, parenting two school-age children, and teaching for two decades. That multi-tiered level of experience – parent, teacher, administrator, board member –  provides her with a unique understanding of education and the delivery of instruction. 

“I have a holistic view of how a district functions,” Wilke said. “I think when I speak with students, I am genuinely able to say to them that I understand them and what they’re experiencing because of raising my own kids. I can empathize with teachers because I know the trials and tribulations of the classroom from my 20 years teaching, including teaching synchronously which I did last year for three months. All this gives me the insight to help and support everyone as best I can.” 

Before coming to Mount Olive, Wilke spent all of her educational career teaching seventh and eighth grade social studies at Randolph Middle School. She also served as eighth grade faculty leader and led professional development presentations on such topics as classroom management, co-teaching models, and writing in the humanities. She has also been a presenter at Montclair University’s summer conference and the annual workshop of the New Jersey Council for Social Studies. 

The veteran educator hit the job running when she began in August. Taking on a new position in a new district is normally difficult on its own, but learning new faces and procedures while in the midst of planning for the post-pandemic reentry of students provided unique challenges.

“That’s the tough part,” said Wilke. “I joke with the other administrators that I’ve been thrown into the deep end of the pool without any floaties. Everyone here, though, has been so wonderful and receptive. Through all our planning, we’ve created a supportive instructional environment for kids.” 

Wilke is the building’s third vice principal, joining Chris Reagan and Nick Cutro. Each VP now supervises a different grade level and will stay with his or her students as they advance through their middle school years. The house plan is designed to create meaningful connections between administrators and kids.

Wilke holds a bachelor’s in political science from Rutgers, a master’s in the art of teaching from Marygrove University in Detroit, and a master’s in education leadership from Centenary University. She was born in Poland and immigrated to the U.S. when she was 9. In addition to spending time with her family (an eighth-grader, a sophomore, and a Wayne math teacher husband) and three dogs, she enjoys reading, traveling, and baking.



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